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“Being a mother has never presented a difficulty to me”, Jane Asscher

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Oct
5,
2011
1

About Jane

After graduating from Oxford in 1985, Jane began her career at Ogilvy and Mather, where she worked on a range of blue chip international advertising accounts. In 1990, Jane moved from advertising to integrated communication agency Tequila, becoming CEO in 1999. She worked across a range of private and public sector accounts including the Department for Transport Drink Driving Wrecks Lives campaign.

Jane has recently been helping to bridge the digital divide with her planning work with the Cabinet Office, and assisting the Department of Health recruit commercial partners for their Change4Life 5 A DAY initiative. She also has extensive experience working with brands focusing on marketing to women and children.

Most recently she has been working on the project Change4Life ‘Really Big Summer Adventure’ – a campaign which aimed to give parents the tools to help create summer activities which would ensure their children got the recommended 60 minutes of active exercise recommended each day.

Jane has also launched the 23red Great Good proposition which focuses on brand ethics and philanthropy (event in September and her paper insight-led publication Market Leader – also in September) and has secured new business with Atkins Nutritionals International to relaunch the brand internationally in countries outside of the US.

What feminine attributes do you think have helped you specifically in your career?Feminine intuition to understand as much about what is not being said as what is being said as well as the ability to multitask and juggle critical to keeping the show on the road at home and at workHas being a mother made ​​any difficulty in your career or otherwise has it brought new perspectives to your marketing vision?Being a mother has never presented a difficulty; in fact it has opened up a whole range of opportunities. The kids help to keep me up to speed with the ever changing digital landscape and media consumption. It never ceases to amaze me how they can watch TV, be on the Blackberry and IPad and Macbook all at the same time. And they make me switch off and recharge my batteries at the end of a busy day

What would you say to women who think having kids will slow their career?

I’d like to say it won’t but I guess that does depend on what industry you are in. I am fortunate to work in an industry that values women’s skills and supports a more flexible way of working

Do you separate your personal life from professional? That is, do you dedicate certain hours to work and certain to leisure and family or is it all part of the same thing?

I do separate the two but work very much around my kids

Do you think that there are differences between men’s and women’s vision of advertising and company management? What do you value most from each point of view?

I have worked with several great male and female leaders in the industry. From the women I have learned all about the emotional intelligence needed to be a great people person and from the men I have learned not to let my emotions and my head rule my heart when it comes to making money

How do you see the future of advertising? Feminine?

I see the future of advertising as being lead by consumers and as such neither exclusively feminine or masculine.

Vanessa Gonzalez

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